Television

Patrick Wymark's early TV appearances resulted from adaptations of Shakespeare Memorial Theatre preformances. The 1955 telecast of Glyn Byam Shaw's production of The Merry Wives of Windsor, featured Wymark as the Host of the Garter Inn, followed by  the role of Montano in a 1955 adaptation of Othello. Moving away from the classics, Wymark played  a character called Dusty in "Tales of Soho", before essaying Menelaus in a 1958 adaptation of Women of Troy.

In 1958 Wymark was cast as Will Lawless in a six part BBC adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson's The Black Arrow. A former Franciscan Friar and follower of the Black Arrow, Lawless was described as a Friar Tuck to the Black Arrow's Robin Hood.

4 October 1959. Wymark played Press Baron Sir Charles Worgan (a character based on Lord Northcliffe), in a BBC Sunday Night Theatre adaptation of Arnold Bennett's playWhat the Public Wants. Hugh Burden played Francis Worgan, Edgar Wreford played Holt St John and Annie Worgan was played by Elizabeth Wallace (who would later play David Corbett's secretary Harriet Evans in the third series of The Plane Makers)

 

On 11 August 1959, Wymark played "the Mayor" in  Brand  a BBC World Theatre production of Henrik Ibsen’s 1866 play directed by Michael Elliot and starring Patrick McGoohan. Based on Elliot’s stage adaptation for the 59 Theatre Company at the Lyric Opera House Hammersmith. Reviewers praised the naturalistic, conversational performances of Wymark and Peter Sallis in contrast to McGoohan's more stylised performance.


“In Elliott’s production the mayor is given a prop that is not specified by Ibsen, resulting in ‘business’ with a cigar. This contrast of registers of acting between performers is dictated by Ibsen’s scenes, rather than by the performers’ decisions
The Doctor, Provost and Mayor are all worldly characters with pragmatic concerns whose dialogue displays a political ability to manipulate the actions of the listener they are talking to, even of a fervent figure like Brand."
Billy Smart
http://screenplaystv.wordpress.com/2012/01/27/world-theatre-brand-bbc-1959/

2 April 1961 Drama '61  (Rediffusion) The Takersby Jacques Gillies  - Patrick Wymark played Boucard a French detective providing security to Baron van Der Zost (Guy Deghy), the fifth richest man in the world. Donald Houston starred as Hartley Downing, who together with Wilkie (Alan Dobie) and Boyd (Kenneth Cope) planned to pull off the biggest deception in history by being, "un-English and unsporting." Downing and Charmian Scott (Dorothy White) move into a London hotel suite next to the heavily guarded penthouse occupied by Baron Van Der Zost.

31 December 1961 Sir Francis Drake  (ITC/ATV) The Garrison - Patrick Wymark played Captain Williams, leader of the British fort at Blanckenburg, besieged by the Spanish and awaiting desparately needed provisions from the Golden Hind.

17 April 1962 The Cherry Orchard (BBC 1)  Based on the Royal Shakespeare Company production. John Gielgud, Judi Dench, Dorothy Tutin, Peggy Ashcroft, with Roy Dotrice, Ian Holm, Patrick Wymark (as the bumbling clerk Epihodov).

16 September 1962 Armchair Theatre (ABC) The Sin Shifter . Set in Wangaree, a pearling centre that has run out of oysters, the play by Bruce Stewart starred Wymark as Manny Barnes, a fisherman who wants to convert the Town Hall into a gambling den. The TV Times publicised the play as being a major shift from Wymark's comic Shakespearian roles, although with James Maxwell, one of the founders of the 59 Theatre Company) as the Catholic priest who opposes Barnes, the play's ethical dilemma could be seen as capitalising on productions such as BRAND.

20 November 1962 Play of the Week (ATV) The Typewriter  by Jean Cocteau (adapted by Giles (Unman, Wittering and Zigo)Cooper, produced and
directed by Joan Kemp-Welch.)The play suvives in the WNET collection of the American Library of Congress. Wymark starred  as Fred, a policeman investigating poison pen letters in a small French town. The play co-starred Margaret Johnston (who would later costar with Wymark in The Psychopath), while Jeremy Brett played a pair of identical but contrasting twins. The Times reviewer thought that Wymark's "improbably amiable detective who pads through the action, brought a touch of humanity to an otherwise sparkling inhuman display"

24 November 1962 (ATV) Man of the World . ITC syndicated series starring Craig Stevens. The Mindreader - Patrick Wymark played Downing.

21 January 1963  Freya of the Seven Isles (BBC)   by Joseph Conrad, adapted by Leo Lehman
Wymark plays Heemskirk, a Dutch officer who destroys both Freya (Ann Lynn) and his love rival (Neville Jason) through his plotting.

25 January 1963  Television Playhouse (ITV) The Paleto Confession  by Patrick Ryan
directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.). Wymark starred  as Father Joseph, alongside Martin Benson and Bernard Archard, with Roy Holder. Writing in the Catholic Herald, Eve McAdam asked, "Why can't writers get away from that old, old situation of the secrecy of the confessional? It came up again in "The Paleto Confession" in which Patrick Wymark. himself a Catholic, played Fr. Joseph. This play by Patrick Ryan, head postmaster at Harrogate, would have been a stronger one had it concerned itself with the sub-plot, about the rehabilitation of the thieving boy (a marvellous performance by Roy Holder). His was the story that held us, that was true to life, and not the grand guignol of the disappearing corpse in the vestry."

The Plane Makers.  First broadcast on 4th February 1963, it began as a series of plays focussing on different sections of the Scott Furlong aeroplane construction company before focussing in September 1963 on Patrick Wymark as the machiavellian John Wilder. For more details go here.

1 March 1963, Wymark returned to comedy in a script by Galton and Simpson for the BBC's Comedy Playhouse. "Our Man in Moscow" starred Robert Morley as the British Ambassador in Moscow dealing with a Russian musician (Wymark) applying for political asylum.

1 April 1963 The Invasion (ABC) was written by novelist Angus Wilson and starred Wymark and EleanorSummerfield as a "new rich" couple whose conflict with the landed gentry provides a smokescreen for a Martian invasion.

11 June 1963 Play of the Week (ATV) The Seventh Wave by Elizabeth Dawson. Directed by Tania Lieven. With Ann Bell as Sally Brent, Anthony Booth as Peter Miller. Patrick Wymark starred as Joe Brent, skipper of the trawler Barnoldby, who blamed Peter Miller for his son's death. Frank Whitmarsh said "He threw himself eagerly into playing the lead...largely because it was about Grimsby.."

The Plane Makers.  16th February 1963 saw the first episode of series two introducing Patrick Wymark as John Wilder. For more details go here.

16 February 1964 Wonderful World of Disney - The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh Part 2 (NBC). Wymark appeared as Joseph Ransley in the second part of Disney's adaptation of Dr Syn (The other episodes ran on 9th and 23rd February). Many UK audiences had already had a chance to see the film version (Dr Syn Alias the Scarecrow) in December 1963.

The Plane Makers.  20th October 1964 saw the third and final series begin with the introduction of Alan Dobie as Wilder's nemesis David Corbett. For more details go here.

16 November 1964 Crime and Punishment  (Rediffusion).  Scripted by Stanley Miller, this two and a half hour adaptation (with a fifteen minute break for the news) starred David Collings as the murdering student Raskalnikov and Patrick Wymark as Porfiry, "facinating but enigmatic, a universal inquisitor, not the voice of an impersonal conscience" (The Times)

2nd December 1964 The Wednesday Play  (BBC 1)– Malatesta  Directed by Christopher Morahan, the play was adapted by Rosemary Hill from a translation by Jonathan Griffin of a story by Henry de Montherlant. Wymark played Sigismondo Malatesta, a ruthless fifteenth-century mercenary relaxing in the cultured surroundings of his palace in Rimini with his wife Isotta (Jessica Dunning). When he learns that the Pope threatens his power, the utterly evil side of his character reasserts itself. "There were times when Wymark;s performance seemed to be trying to burst out of the little box which imprisoned it (but) no conscientious account of the part could be small enough to fit in a television set (The Times 3 Dec)"

On December 16 1964, Patrick Wymark received the Best TV Actor Award from the Guild of TV Producers. After the awards ceremony at the Dorchester Hotel, he announced that he intended to leave The Planemakers because he wanted a change."

21 January 1965. Towards 2000 (Rediffusion ) 35 Years to Go Patrick Wymark introduced an episode of the documentary series looking at signposts along the way, from Shakespeare to the present, towards an unknown future.

"A series that looks at the implications of the next 40 years and the probable problems we face in the year 2000, such as over population and automation used in the work place."

February 1965. Night Spot (Rediffusion). Patrick Wymark is a guest in the late night variety series set in a real night club.With hosts Frank Berry and Norma Ronald (Miss Lingard in The Plane Makers).

6 March 1965 Sherlock Holmes  (BBC 1) - The Copper Beeches 
Douglas Wilmer (Sherlock Holmes) Nigel Stock (Dr. Watson) Patrick Wymark (Jephro Rucastle) Suzanne Neve (Miss Violet Hunter) Alethea Carlton (Mrs Rucastle).For a longer review go here.

22 March 1965. Play of the Week: I Remember the Battle (ATV). Written By Douglas Livingstone, directed by Dennis Vance. In his first ITV drama since leaving The Plane Makers, Patrick Wymark stars as William Peglar, a mediocre man who believes he had a touch of greatness in the war. He has published a book about his most heroic exploit, and a group of men from his old unit ask him to unveil a monument to the men who didn't come back. With Brian Wilde, Valerie White, John Tate and Harry Fowler.

 

28 Mar. 1965. The Eamonn Andrews Show: with Bob Monkhouse, Gerry and the Pacemakers, Dionne Warwick

11 October 1965. This Year's Girl (Rediffusion). Written By Allan Prior. Starring Anne Cunningham and Sonia Dresdel with Patrick Wymark as Tom Delahunty.

18 October 1965 Summertime Ends Tonight (Redifusion). Wymark played Miles Parker QC.

On 13 December 1965, Wymark returned as Sir John Wilder in the first series of The Power Game

On 4 May 1966, Patrick Wymark introduced an episode of Gods Trombone Southern TV's religious variety show. Broadcast from Brighton College Chapel, the show featured Dame Flora Robson, Marion Montgomery and Miki & Griff .

On 26 September 1966, The Power Game returned for a second series until 19 December 1966.

29 November 1966 A Royal Gala (ITV) In the presence of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh, this appears to have been to make up for the fact that the BBC was showing the Royal Variety Performance that year. Cliff Richard, Violet Carson, Pat Pheonix, the Beverley Sisters and Patrick Wymark were the top-billed stars. An extract exists showing William Mervyn (as Inspector Rose) vetting Coronation Street before the Duke of Edinburgh drives past. Arthur Lowe and Kenneth Cope (as former characters Leonard Swindley and Jed Stone) also appear alongside Phillip Lowrie as Dennis Tanner. It's not clear if Wymark was in character for this show.

25 December 1966 Secombe, Friends and Relations. Christmas special with Harry Secombe, Michael Bentine, Dora Bryan, Patrick Wymark and Acker Bilk.

15 January 1967  The Eamonn Andrews Show: (ABC)  With Barbara Murray, Lynda Baron, Ted Ray.

11 December 1967 Play of the Week - Top of the Ladder by Tyrone Guthrie. Adapted by Cyril Coke. With Shirley Cain, Rachel Herbert, Derek Francis, John Wood, Patrick Wymark (Bertie)

20 January 1968 Once More with Felix (BBC2) Patrick Wymark joins folk singer Julie Felix

ITV Playhouse:The Judge (Anglia TV 12 March 1968). Written by John Mortimer amd directed by Dennis Vance, Wymark had starred in the recent stage version. The TV play had location filming in Lincoln Cathedral and the Castle Law Courts. On the eve of his retirement, Mr Justice Chard returns to his home town after 30 years seeking out hidden corruption. Reviewing the stage version, Milton Schulman noted that "Patrick Wymark...plays the judge on a consistent note of harsh, unforgiving self-flagellation." After watching the play on TV, Patrick Wymark reportedly attended a reception at 10 Downing Street for the Prime Minister of Luxumbourg, and talked with Harold Wilson about the Rhodesian situation

Howerd's Hour (ABC 12 May 1968). Comedy special written by Eric Sykes and starring Frankie Howerd with Hattie Jacques, Patrick Wymark, Janet Mahoney and Sandie Shaw.

The Champions (ATV 30 October 1968). Operation Deep Freeze. Filmed in 1967, and showed at various dates on other ITV stations. Wymark guest starred as General Gomez, leader of a small but aggressive South American state developing an atomic bomb in the Antarctic in this episode.For a longer review go here.

7 January 1969 - The Power Game returned for a third series, ending 1st April.

Frankie Howerd at the Poco a Poco (Thames TV 7 May 1969) Directed by William G. Stewart and written by former Morecambe and Wise scripters Sid Green and Dick Hills it starred Frankie Howerd, with guests Patrick Wymark and Hank B. Marvin.The Poco a Poco was a club and casino, formerly the Empress Cinema, Stockport.
 

29 November 1970 Hans Christian Andersen. Broadcast posthumously, this was a 75 minute Musical Comedy special for Nine Network   Sydney, Australia.  With Patti McGrath, Richard Deacon, John Fraser, and Patrick Wymark as the EmperorFor more details go here.

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